Tag Archives: Turbo Charger

Have You Checked Your Oil Supply For Your Diesel Turbocharger Lately?

There are many little things that you can do to make your turbocharger last longer.  One of the simplest things to do for preventive maintenance is to check your oil and fluid levels. If the supply is not sufficient to properly lubricate the system, a lot of bad things can happen.  At Western Turbo, we see many damaged turbochargers due to insufficient oil supply.

 

turbocharger service

 

Here are some attributes that lead to damage due to insufficient oil supply;

 

  • Re-fitting a turbocharger without adequate priming
  • Long periods of non-use
  • Broken or restricted oil feed pipe
  • Low engine oil pressure due to malfunctioning lubrication system
  • Low or no oil in sump
  • The use of sealants, which can restrict the oil flow
  • Not priming a replacement oil filter with new oil.  If this cannot be done, then crank the engine with no fuel to establish oil pressure.
  • Do not exceed idle conditions until oil pressure is established

Regular maintenance by Winnipeg’s largest diesel service centre should ensure that your diesel turbo charger is in top working order.   Western Turbo can set you up on a preventive maintenance program for your individual diesel or fleet requirements.  Whether you are in Winnipeg, or rural Manitoba, give us a call for you next service.

How does a Turbocharger work anyway?

Sometimes at Western Turbo, we get so wrapped up in helping our customers get back on the road that we forget that education is one of the best things that we can do to help our customers understand when they need to call the best diesel service centre in Manitoba.

Below is a short article on how a turbocharger works and why this is such a key component to the performance of your diesel engine.

The purpose of a turbocharger is to compress the air flowing into the diesel engine, this lets the engine squeeze more air into a cylinder and more air means that more fuel can be added. The engine burns air and fuel to create mechanical power, the more air and fuel it can burn the more powerful it is. In simple terms, a turbocharger comprises a turbine and a compressor connected by a common shaft supported on a bearing system. The turbocharger converts waste energy from an engine’s exhaust gases into compressed air, which it pushes into the engine. This allows the engine to burn more fuel producing more power and improve the overall efficiency of the combustion process. The turbine consists of two components; the turbine wheel and the collector, commonly referred to as the turbine housing. The exhaust gas is guided into the turbine wheel by the housing. The energy in the exhaust gas turns the turbine. Once the gas has passed through the blades of the wheel it leaves the turbine housing via the exhaust outlet area.

Compressors are the opposite of turbines. They consist of two sections; the impeller or compressor wheel and the compressor housing. The compressor wheel is connected to the turbine by a forged steel shaft. As the compressor wheel spins, air is drawn in and is compressed as the blades spin at a high velocity. The housing is designed to convert the high velocity, low pressure air stream, into a high pressure low velocity air stream, through a process called diffusion. In order to achieve this boost, the turbocharger uses the exhaust flow from the engine to spin a turbine, which in turn spins an air pump. The turbine in the turbocharger spins at speeds of up to 150,000 rotations per minute (rpm) that is about 30 times faster than most car engines can go. Since it is connected to the exhaust, the temperatures in the turbine are also very high. Air enters the compressor at a temperature compression causes the temperature of the air to rise it leaves the compressor cover at temperatures up to 200°C. The turbocharger bearing system is lubricated by oil from the engine. The oil is fed under pressure into the bearing housing, through to the journal bearings and thrust system. The oil also acts as a coolant taking away heat generated by the turbine. The journal bearings are a free floating rotational type.

To perform correctly, the journal bearings should float between a film of oil. The bearing clearances are very small, less than the width of a human hair. Dirty oil or blockages in the oil supply holes can cause serious damage to the turbocharger.

Western Turbo repairs turbochargers

Now that you know how a turbocharger works, we will look at some of the reasons in our next blog why turbochargers fail and how Western Turbo diagnoses the problem and decides whether to rebuild or replace.

Where is Your Turbocharger from?

Dealers and garages are being warned not to fit cheap turbochargers to cars after a series of engine failures following the installation of counterfeit turbochargers.

You get what you pay for

Counterfeit turbochargers replicate the OEM tags and part numbers and try to pass them off as genuine. They are built out of very poor quality material, and are prone to short life failures. One of the issues with these turbos is containment failure.

Turbocharger Western Turbo

In the case of a wheel-burst failure, the disintegrating compressor debris can exit through the compressor cover

This event is like a hand grenade going off.

A turbocharger is a complex piece of engineering.  If standards are not high for remanufacturing, then the customer could be in for a host of problems relating to the poor performance, or the turbocharger literally exploding.

Dealing with a reputable diesel parts and service facility like Western Turbo ensures that your new or remanufactured turbocharger is of the highest standards and guaranteed to perform.  We only provide you with quality diesel turbochargers from quality manufacturers like Holset, Garrett, and Borg Warner/Schwitzer.   Before replacing, we can diagnose your existing turbocharger and offer you a quality rebuild if that makes the most sense.

Just another reason why Western Turbo is Manitoba’s diesel service centre

Turbo Trivia Part 1 – Common Turbocharger Problems

While modern turbochargers are highly evolved systems that provide relatively trouble-free service for the lifetime of your engine, it’s good to be able to recognize the symptoms of turbocharger troubles and their causes, to simplify repair of one of your vehicle’s key performance improvement systems.  Very often, a turbocharger problem is the result of an issue elsewhere in the system, and will recur unless the underlying issue is addressed.

Exhaust Smoke – Black

There are a lot of issues that can cause excessive black particulate in your vehicles exhaust.  Look to the air filter system and the supply of oil to the turbocharger, as well as damage to the unit itself.  Often the turbine housing, flap, or turbocharger bearing will have failed, or the boost pressure control swing valve isn’t closing properly.  This problem can also be caused by problems elsewhere in the engine – worn valve guides, piston rings, or cylinder walls can cause blow by that manifests itself as black smoke.

Exhaust Smoke – Blue

Blue smoke can be caused by a number of factors, including overall engine wear.  Turbocharger related causes of this symptom include dirty compressors, excessive exhaust flow resistance, or bearing damage.  Look out for dirty air filter systems, or a buildup of coke and sludge buildup in the turbocharger housing.

Excessive Boost Pressure

If your boost pressure is too high, the likely cause is in the swing or poppet valve or the associated pipe assembly to it.  It could also be caused by a fuel injection problem.

Defective Compressor or Turbine Wheels

The high-speed spinning parts of the turbo unit can be damaged by excessive heat and friction caused by improper lubrication.  If these parts are worn or broken, they’ll need to be replaced.

Oil Consumption

High oil consumption can be caused by a number of factors, including worn out engine components like piston rings, valve guides, and cylinder walls.  It could also be a symptom of something as simple as a dirty air filter system, or an improperly vented crankcase.

For expert diagnosis of your diesel engine in Winnipeg, visit Western Turbo.  In addition to maintenance and repair of turbo systems, we provide new equipment for the leading brands in the business – Holset, BorgWarner, and Garrett.

Western Turbo is located at 325 Eagle Drive in Winnipeg.

Insist on OEM

It has been said that stock runs best. Simply put, low grade aftermarket parts are no particular bargain if they don’t perform properly or possess the same degree of longevity that original equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts provide. When it comes to your livelihood, as it pertains to your turbochargers, insist on OEM replacement parts purchased through a reputable source.

Most modern diesel engines are turbocharged. A turbocharger allows the engine’s horsepower and torque to be multiplied through forced air induction. Inside the turbocharger housing is both a turbine and an air pump. Both are driven using the same shaft. Spent exhaust gases, escaping the compression chamber, are used to drive a turbine at very high RPM. As the exhaust turns the turbine, the air pump impeller draws high-volume, low-pressure ambient air into the engine. The ambient air is drawn in through the front air-dam and the intercooler, in order to ensure that a steady source of cooler, denser air is available to the air pump. This additional air induction allows the engine to burn an increased amount of fuel, resulting in more horsepower and torque.

Why buy OEM Turbochargers?

Aftermarket turbochargers aren’t manufactured to the same stringent specifications as OEM one, neither are they made from the same top-quality steel and components. Turbochargers are by nature very powerful, yet they operate under very delicate circumstances. The turbine wheel and housing must be meticulously machined and assembled; tolerances between the impeller and housing can be well under several thousandths of an inch. Extreme temperatures from the exhaust, which drives the air pump, coupled with these very close tolerances demand that the turbocharger be designed, engineered, and manufactured to the most rigid guidelines. You just don’t get that type of quality anywhere but OEM for turbochargers.

The next time that you have a problem with your turbo diesel, trust the professionals at Western Turbo to provide you with quality parts and experienced, courteous service.

Keep Your Snow Plow Moving In Winter

Winter is upon us, in full force. With snow and ice on the streets, already, we can expect that December, January, and February will feature more of the same with the potential to halt traffic and even cause horrendous collisions. Equipment operators brave the cold weather and brutal conditions keeping the streets clear, but they need their diesel loaders, snow plows, and spreaders maintained carefully to ensure reliable service no matter what the weather has in store.

Snow removal personnel are up and at ‘em, bright and early, everyday; keeping the streets clear for traffic to pass. If their start is delayed, then the entire city suffers. There is much more at stake than just moving some snow and ice. Lives could be in danger.

The time tested adage says, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Nowhere is this phrase more thoroughly proven than in the snow removal industry. Cold weather and diesel engines can be a challenging combination, but regular inspections and proper maintenance can give you the edge on the cold and save you dollars in the long run.

In addition to regularly scheduled maintenance, operators can keep their equipment running smoothly by performing daily inspections. A custom tailored and detailed daily inspection checklist for each vehicle is an excellent system for preventing small malfunctions from becoming huge catastrophes. Key points should include:

  • Checking and topping off all fluids.
  • Visual inspection of blades, teeth, hardware, hydraulic lines, and linkages.
  • Visual inspection of braking components, including master cylinder.
  • Check tire air pressure and tread condition, including minimum tread depth.

For all of your regularly scheduled maintenance needs, complete bumper-to-bumper service, as well as state-of-the-art diesel, direct injection, and turbo repair, you can count on Western Turbo, Winnipeg’s premier turbo diesel repair facility.

Turbo Charger Failure Checklist

Troubleshooting can be a daunting task for the average diesel owner, given the complexity of modern engine technology. But with a little understanding of how systems work, and what a functioning engine looks and sounds like, it’s not difficult to identify potential problems before they become expensive ones. Turbochargers, for instance, are generally only going to fail due to some form of mechanical damage or physical restriction, such as a blockage from debris. So it’s advisable to look for other likely culprits when failures other than these present themselves. The following is a useful checklist to help you troubleshoot failures in your turbocharger and locate their potential causes:

Excess Smoke

If you see excessive smoke coming from your turbo, look for restrictions around your intake, dirty air filter, seal or gasket leaks; inspect for cracks in the exhaust manifold.

Engine Runs Hot

Check for leaking hoses, seized valves, restrictions to air flow at compressor intake. Check air filter. Excessive heat can also be the result of incorrectly fuel injectors or injector pump. Check manufacturer documentation for proper settings.

Engine Lacks Power

In addition to a potentially damaged turbo unit, other possible causes for loss of engine power include incorrect valve timing, burnt valves or pistons; air leak between compressor and intake manifold, or intake manifold and engine. Check also for restrictions, foreign object blockage or leaks in exhaust system.

High/Excessive Oil Consumption

Check for: restrictions in turbocharger oil drain line or crankcase breather; worn piston rings, dirt build-up on impellers. Look for coking, or sludge build-up in turbo bearing housing.

Noisy Turbocharger

If the turbocharger is operating at a higher than normal noise level, or whistling, there are several possible causes, apart from damage to the turbo unit itself, most often some form of either air leak or restriction. Check for restrictions, leaks, or blockages as previously described, focusing first on the intake area, then look for blockages or cracks in the exhaust.