Tag Archives: fuel efficiency

Heavy Duty Diesel or Gas Pickup Truck, Which is Best for You?

Have you been mulling over getting a heavy duty diesel, but you’re just not sure if you should make the switch or not? It’s true, a diesel truck will give you more power and more engine life overall.

There are a number of pros and cons that are dependant upon many factors, from your lifestyle, to your job, to what you do in your leisure time.

If you have friends with diesel pickup trucks, talk to them about their experience and satisfaction with their vehicle. Read this article for more details about the major differences between diesel and gas pickups.

If you have more questions after your read, we’d be happy to answer them!

Mazda To Delay SKYACTIV-D Clean Diesel Launch In North America

AUTOSERVICEWORLD.COM


Mazda Canada Inc. has announced that the launch of its SKYACTIV-D clean diesel engine in North America is being further delayed from its Spring 2014 announced debut timing.

While Mazda understands its SKYACTIV-D can meet emission regulation requirements without the use of a NOx after-treatment system, it has decided that further development is required to deliver the right balance between fuel economy and Mazda-appropriate driving performance.

Further information on the program, including a timeline of launch for North America, technical specifications and fuel economy will be available at a later date, closer to launch.

ADS News

Clean diesel automobile sales in the United States have increased 25.6 percent in 2012, according to sales information compiled by HybridCars.Com and Baum and Associates.   http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/us-clean-diesel-auto-sales-increase-256-percent-in-2012-181048881.html?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Honeywell’s 2-Cylinder Diesel Engine

A new chapter in the story of ultra-fuel efficient auto design opened in 2011 with the development of the world’s first 2-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine.

Today, the 0.8L engine, boosted by Honeywell’s smallest-ever turbo, can be seen powering vehicles through the busy streets of India’s cities and towns, typically carrying goods from warehouses to local businesses. For Honeywell, boosting such a small engine created a whole new set of design and engineering challenges.

“The issues in developing a turbo for a 2-cylinder engine not only revolve around packaging but also around specific challenges linked to compressor surge, oil leakage, high vibrations and high thrust load due to engine pulsations. These issues are far more pronounced here than in a four-cylinder engine,” says Vijayan Asvathanarayanan, Director of Application Engineering for Honeywell Turbo Technologies in India.

This meant that Honeywell engineers had to approach the turbo design from a completely new angle.

“We came up with a totally new turbocharger that included a very small turbine housing with integrated manifold, and the smallest-ever compressor wheel developed by Honeywell. The higher relative thrust loads brought about by the pulsation of a bi-cylinder engine meant creating new concept thrust pads in the Z-bearing – vital if we were to be efficient in matching the turbo to the engine requirements.”

A high-efficiency, compact bearing was developed – and the design was so successful that it is now being extended to other turbo sizes as well.

The result of this intense engineering activity is a well-performing and reliable turbo fitted in the 2-cylinder OEM production engine since 2011, which is contributing to a remarkable 25% improvement in power over a non-turbo equivalent and to significant fuel efficiency gains and lower emissions.

Critically, the proven success paves the way for the roll-out of a new generation of turbocharged 2- and 3-cylinder diesel passenger cars and light commercial vehicles, particularly in emerging regions.

Happy 100th Birthday to the Turbocharger

A century ago, Swiss engineer Alfred Buchi was studying steam turbines when inspiration struck: Why not spin the wheel with exhaust from an internal combustion engine and use the recovered energy to force-feed the intake side? It was a brilliant concept, since roughly a third of the energy in fuel is normally squandered out the tailpipe. Buchi applied for a patent to cover his invention in 1905.

ADS News – The Passenger Car & Light Duty Vehicle (LDV) Diesel Engine Market 2013-2023

By Reportlinker
Published: Monday, Oct. 22, 2012 – 8:35 am

NEW YORK, Oct. 22, 2012 — /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: The Passenger Car & Light Duty Vehicle (LDV) Diesel Engine Market 2013-2023 Diesel engines are becoming an increasingly attractive solution to high oil prices and the resulting high running costs of passenger cars and LDVs. Diesel engines are 20-40% more efficient than petrol engines depending on vehicle size and performance. Higher efficiency results in lower fuel consumption and lower carbon dioxide emissions for comparable performance. Diesel engines thus offer a solution to both economic and environmental challenges in the automotive sector. As a consequence Visiongain has determined that the total number of unit sales in the passenger car & LDV diesel engine market in 2013 will reach 11.54m.

Read more here

ADS News – Ford Fiesta Gets 90 mpg with ECOnetic Diesel Engine

Just when you thought the internal combustion engine was dead, Ford engineers produce a 1.6-liter diesel engine that blows away the fuel-efficiency marathon record with an astounding 90.65 mpg in a Ford Fiesta. The record was set at the respected Fleet World MPG Marathon event that was recently held in the UK. The Fiesta with ECOnetic Technology used just 16.22 liters (4.28 gallons) over the 624 km (388 mile) course. The marathon takes the competitors and their cars over public roads “through tricky conditions” in south Wales and the Cotswold region of England.
ford-fiesta
The record result was set during the 2012 ALD Automotive/Shell FuelSave MPG Marathon, and was organized by Fleet World magazine in the UK. The diesel powered Ford Fiesta went up against competition including the Toyota Yaris Hybrid, Fiat Panda Multijet Easy, Volkswagen Golf Match Tdi 105 and Kia Rio 1.1 CRDi 1 Eco.

The driver used Eco-driving techniques, and the results were 21 percent lower than the official fuel-mileage ratings. But the results still come from real-world driving conditions on public roads. “Eco-driving techniques can massively lower your fuel consumption in any car, but to reach such levels you need a car designed for the job, and Fiesta ECOnetic Technology certainly is,” said Andreas Ostendorf, vice president Sustainability, Environment and Safety Engineering, Ford of Europe.

ECOnetic Technology brings together a range of new fuel-saving technologies. It starts with Fords new fuel-stingy 1.6-liter TDCi diesel engine. Diesel engines have always been known to be fuel-efficient and Ford’s new engine technology is proving they are here to stay. European automakers has been using diesel powerplants for decades and have been hugely successful in powering their cars.

Other ECOnetic Technology features on the marathon-winning Ford Focus include Auto-Start-Stop, Smart Regenerative Charging, Active Grille Shutter, EcoMode, Gear Shift Indicator, bespoke engine calibration and optimized gear ratios with a six-speed transmission. The Fiesta also gets a lower suspension, wheel deflectors and low-rolling resistance tires that reduce friction from the air and road. The Ford Fiesta also incorporates special underbody shielding making it highly aerodynamic.

While most drivers won’t achieve the kind of mileage the marathon vehicle produced, the Ford Focus with ECOnetic Technology still gets impressive fuel economy of over 70 mpg. The Ford ECOnetic Technology will also be put in the new Ford Focus which will go on sale across Europe this month. The 2012 Ford Fiesta is already Europe’s number one selling small car, and when Ford of Europe’s most fuel-efficient passenger car hits showrooms, it may move the small diesel powered car to the top of the list. Let’s hope Ford brings the fuel-stingy diesel to the U.S.

ADS News – LiquidPiston Unveils Ultra Efficient, Small Diesel Engine

By Katie Fehrenbacher from Gigaom

The internal combustion is officially still alive, and delivering efficiency innovation.

While electric cars get a lot of media attention, the reality is that the internal combustion engine is far from dead, particularly for the future car owners in the developing world. A startup called LiquidPiston — which has been around for years and which got its start as a father-son team in a business plan competition at MIT — is in the process of developing a diesel engine which is far more efficient, smaller and quieter than a standard diesel engine.

The engine, called the X2, will be available as a beta prototype for outside testing by the first quarter of 2013. The engine is able to achieve more than 50 percent efficiency under typical operating modes, while typical diesel engines usually achieve less than 20 percent efficiency.

The X2 is a new type of engine architecture, based on a rotary engine. LiquidPiston CEO and President Alexander Shklonik told met in an interview that this new version of the rotary engine is more flexible and can thus be more efficient when optimized in the right way. The engine is smaller, lighter, and cheaper, with ten times fewer parts, than current diesel engines on the market, says Shklonik.

Shklonik told me in a phone interview that the first applications for the engine won’t be the mainstream automotive industry, but will be industries like defense, long haul trucks, plug-in vehicle range extenders, and other more niche markets. LiquidPiston has raised $12.3 million so far, and tells me that it’s looking to raise another $20 million later this year. The company has around 12 employees.

Other startups that have developed more fuel efficient engines include EcoMotors, Pinnacle Engines, and IRIS Engines. More efficient engines will be used in both the next-generation of cars sold in developing countries, and also countries like the U.S. that have new fuel efficiency standards. The Obama administration passed the CAFE standards, which require a fuel efficiency of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025.

Fuel Efficiency Top Priority

At long last, fuel efficiency has made its way to the top of the list, when it comes to consumer priorities. According to a recent consumer report, when shopping for a new car, up to 37 percent of people have identified fuel efficiency as their first concern. This could mean a radical change in the way manufacturers design cars, should consumer pressure increase.
Historically consumers have opted for high performance, fuel guzzling or heavy cars. These types of vehicles, largely favoured by United States consumers, have always dominated the market. However, according to the survey, rising fuel prices have caused a significant shift towards more fuel-efficient vehicles. Potentially, a one litre engine in a family sedan is something we could see in the very near future.
Another issue, which has prompted a change of thinking among consumers, is the environment. Two thirds of those surveyed stated that they wished to drive more “green”. This represents a huge increase from previous surveys. It would appear that carbon foot print, coupled with the depletion of natural fuel sources, is weighing heavily on the minds of the average consumer. It may take a while before manufacturers get fully on board, however, change seems inevitable.