Tag Archives: diesel fuel manitoba

Diesel Fuel Filtration

Fuel Manager® –   Diesel Fuel Filtration  FM1, FM10, FM100 and FM1000

Complete Systems, Elements and Service Parts

Stanadyne’s Fuel Manager diesel fuel filter/water separator systems are used globally in a wide variety  of diesel engine powered applications. As a modular system, optional Fuel Manager features can be  selected to address specific operating requirements. This versatility allows the user to have the optimum fuel system filtration combined with exceptional economy.
The Fuel Manager series includes: FM1, FM10, FM100 and FM1000. Each of these Fuel Manager types serve specific engine power ratings for engines from 7.3 to 447 kW (10 to 600 BHP). All Fuel Manager elements are fuel/water separators with provisions for draining coalesced water. Systems are for use with diesel fuel and bio-blended diesel fuel, and are not for use with gasoline or other volatile fuels.

Stanadyne’s Fuel Manager diesel fuel filter/water separator systems are used globally in awide variety of diesel engine powered applications. As a modular system, optional FuelManager features can be selected to address specific operating requirements. Thisversatility allows the user to have the optimum fuel system filtration combined withexceptional economy.The Fuel Manager series includes: FM1, FM10, FM100 and FM1000. Each of these FuelManager types serve specific engine power ratings for engines from 7.3 to 447 kW (10 to600 BHP). All Fuel Manager elements are fuel/water separators with provisions fordraining coalesced water. Systems are for use with diesel fuel and bio-blended diesel fuel,and are not for use with gasoline or other volatile fuels.

We Know Diesel Engines

Today’s Diesel engines are electronically sophisticated. They rely on computers to provide optimum timing, fuel control and emission system. Varying temperatures and load conditions can also cause stress on the engines.

Here at the Diesel Service Centre at Western Turbo, we know Diesel Engines. We use OEM-specific scan tools and software from each manufacturer.  We work with only the latest applications. Our service techs are trained in all aspects of the diagnostics equipment to provide the best service possible for your Diesel vehicle.

Bring in your Diesel vehicle today for service. (If you ‘like’ us on Facebook, you can receive a Free Scan and Report).

Benefits of Diesel Fuel

You have probably rolled into a gas station, pumping up your regular gas and have wondered what the differences is between fuels.

There are several differences between the two in regards to efficiency, performance, emission, and price. In regards to efficiency, diesel is better. For every litre of diesel fuel you burn, the distance you travel is longer than that with unleaded. With performance and considering the power factor, diesel engines usually come with a V6 or turbo aspect and with the use of the torque capabilities. This produces higher power acceleration. The only difference is that unleaded fuel engines are quieter than diesel. Next, it is true that diesel emits more greenhouse gases, but considering it is more fuel efficient, this factor offsets the high emission and actually has less emission for the distance traveled.

Diesel fuel accounted for just 23% of all fuels sold in Canada

Statistics Canada reported in 2002 that diesel fuel accounted for just 23% of all fuels sold in Canada. Gasoline, BTEX and propane provided the remainder. If so little in comparison to other fuels was sold, why do we choose it?

The Net Heat of Combustion or energy content between gasoline and diesel fuel seems very close to me, 32.2 MJ/L for gasoline and 36.4 MJ/L. If you compare that to the Net Heat of Combustion of propane at 24.1 MJ/L as a low to a high of 42.2 MJ/L for Bunker “6C” as high, it should look obvious that engines running on Bunker “6C” are the best choices for fuel economy.

In fact, if you use the formula; Net Heat of Combustion divided by the cost per litre you will more accurately see a financial advantage to using diesel fuel. Additionally, the average spark ignited engine that uses gasoline may only utilize 15%-25% of the available energy of the fuel. Against a diesel engine that may utilize up to 50% of the available energy of the fuel with some approaching 60% in hybrid applications, it’s a little easier to see why there are more diesels in the family garage.

Remember when putting garbage on the curb was environmentally responsible? That attitude is changing with recycling and composting, so is the choice in what powers our lives.

Requests for reference documentation of this article or any others written by Mike Munroe can be obtained by e-mail at: mike.munroe@westernturbo.com.

We used ATF and Gasoline too, a very long time ago.

 Urban Myths of Fuel Additives Statement by Mike Munroe

 

As a young apprentice keeping fixed timed diesel engines running all winter, it was a common practice to add automatic transmission fluid or other products to our machines in an effort to keep them running smoothly. We even used gasoline as additive to help them start and sometimes kerosene. Perhaps the worst concoction we used was a combination of methyl hydrate and chlorethylene to prevent freeze ups. Still widely used are Isopropanol and kerosene mixtures as combination anti-gel and lubricity additives.

 

ATF and the trade names associated with automatic transmission fluid was at one time very simple SAE 10 engine oil with red dye added to distinguish it. With the introduction of sophisticated automatic transmission technology came the demand for the lubricant to perform additional duty such as react like a hydraulic fluid and perform the duties of a coolant. ATF now can contain additives up to 30% of its content. Some of these additives have poor solubility at lower temperatures.

 

Some of the additives found are Boron, Molybdenum, Calcium, Zinc and Phosphorus and are formulated with other elements to form complex compounds to provide the necessary demands of the ATF. Some of these demands are viscosity improvers, friction modifiers, anti-wear agents, dispersants, metal deactivators, friction control and many other requirements specific to the make of transmission.

 

Modern fuel systems have the same demands as their predecessors. The requirements are pretty simple, clean, and dry and lubricate. With higher injection pressures and emissions controls, the basics of the fuel are even more important than before. Adding ATF and the associated additives can be harmful to the fuel system, the engine itself and perhaps negate the benefits of any emission controls or exhaust after-treatments.

 

Your choice in fuel additives should be limited to those approved by the engine manufacturer or the fuel system manufacturer. Stanadyne Fuel Conditioners are approved and readily available at the Diesel Service Centre.

 

We don’t use frost shields on our windows anymore.

 

 

Further information may be obtained by e-mail at info@westernturbo.com.

First line of Defense, at the SOURCE

Since May 15th, 2010, all diesel fuel sold in Manitoba will contain a minimum of 5% bio-diesel, of B-5. Documentation on the Province of Manitoba’s mandate can be obtained at http://www.gov.mb.ca/stem/energy/biofuels/biodiesel/.
Biodiesel may contain small but problematic quantities of water. Although it is not miscible with water, it is, like ethanol, hygroscopic (absorbs water from atmospheric moisture). One of the reasons biodiesel can absorb water is the persistence of mono and diglycerides left over from an incomplete reaction. These molecules can act as an emulsifier, allowing water to mix with the biodiesel. In addition, there may be water that is residual to processing or resulting from storage tank condensation. The presence of water is a problem because:
Water reduces the heat of combustion of the bulk fuel. This means more smoke, harder starting, less power.
Water causes corrosion of vital fuel system components: fuel pumps, injector pumps, fuel lines, etc.
Water & microbes cause the paper element filters in the system to fail (rot), which in turn results in premature failure of the fuel pump due to ingestion of large particles.
Water freezes to form ice crystals near 0 °C (32 °F). These crystals provide sites for nucleation and accelerate the gelling of the residual fuel.
Water accelerates the growth of microbe colonies, which can plug up a fuel system. Biodiesel users who have heated fuel tanks therefore face a year-round microbe problem.
Additionally, water can cause pitting in the pistons on a diesel engine.
Previously, the amount of water contaminating biodiesel has been difficult to measure by taking samples, since water and oil separate. However, it is now possible to measure the water content using water-in-oil sensors.
Further information may be obtained by e-mail at info@westernturbo.com.
Bio-Fuel Statement by Mike Munroe
Since May 15th, 2010, all diesel fuel sold in Manitoba will contain a minimum of 5% bio-diesel, of B-5.  Documentation on the Province of Manitoba’s mandate can be obtained here.
Biodiesel may contain small but problematic quantities of water. Although it is not miscible with water, it is, like ethanol, hygroscopic (absorbs water from atmospheric moisture). One of the reasons biodiesel can absorb water is the persistence of mono and diglycerides left over from an incomplete reaction. These molecules can act as an emulsifier, allowing water to mix with the biodiesel. In addition, there may be water that is residual to processing or resulting from storage tank condensation. The presence of water is a problem because:
Water reduces the heat of combustion of the bulk fuel. This means more smoke, harder starting, less power.
Water causes corrosion of vital fuel system components: fuel pumps, injector pumps, fuel lines, etc.
Water & microbes cause the paper element filters in the system to fail (rot), which in turn results in premature failure of the fuel pump due to ingestion of large particles.
Water freezes to form ice crystals near 0 °C (32 °F). These crystals provide sites for nucleation and accelerate the gelling of the residual fuel.
Water accelerates the growth of microbe colonies, which can plug up a fuel system. Biodiesel users who have heated fuel tanks therefore face a year-round microbe problem.
Additionally, water can cause pitting in the pistons on a diesel engine.
Previously, the amount of water contaminating biodiesel has been difficult to measure by taking samples, since water and oil separate. However, it is now possible to measure the water content using water-in-oil sensors.
Further information may be obtained by e-mail at info@westernturbo.com.