Tag Archives: bio diesel

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Fuel Pump Failures Under Scrutiny

Volkswagen and Audi TDIs are under investigation for fuel pump failures. The NHTSA opened the investigation in February 2011 on the 2009 and 2010 Golf and Jetta models. The issues seem to center around contaminated fuel and the high pressure fuel pump not being capable of dealing with diesel that’s been contaminated by gasoline either by the customer or the fueling station.

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The EPA’s proposed increases in the 2012 percentage standards for advanced biofuels and renewable diesel fuel is another important step in helping the United States achieve a sustainable energy future, according to Allen Schaeffer, the executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum (DTF).

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Obviously, diesel oil is synonymous with the diesel engine because it is the most common fuel used in the diesel engine. However, as society’s demands increase and technology advances, experts are developing more and more alternative fuels for use in the diesel engine.

Biocides are a SHORT TERM Solution

Microbial Contamination of Fuels Statement by Mike Munroe

 

With the introduction and wide spread use of Bio-Diesel in Manitoba, has also seen a demand for control of microbial contamination in diesel fuel storage vessels. Characterized as a “greenish-black or brown” slime and often accompanied by an offensive odour, these colonies will attack diesel fuel system components.

 

Most often in the past, these micro-organisms (yeast, molds, bacteria and algae) were seen with warm and humid conditions in association with water. Large storage tanks were often the source but recently, with the prevalence of B-5, or diesel fuel containing 5% biodiesel and its hygroscopic nature, are being seen more often than previous in fuel tanks on mobile equipment. The first complaint is usually that of premature fuel filter plugging and left untreated, complaints have even been that of fuel system deterioration. Elastomer fuel system components, seals and hoses, are particularly vulnerable to microbial contamination.

 

Remediation of this problem has been at the source in past practices. Often, draining the fuel and treating the vessel with an alcohol has been effective. With the use of B-5 and the degradation of the mono and diglycerides, requires constant diligence to control the microbial contamination. This has lead to the widespread use of Biocides.

 

Biocides are effective in controlling microbial contamination but can’t eliminate the solids created by the colonies. This will result in migration of these colonies and can result in continued filter plugging or possibly clogged lines. Most of the biocides in use are toxic to humans and the controlled colonies can not be introduced into a waste water treatment stream as the biocide may kill beneficial bacteria used in waste water treatment.

 

The continued use of biocides can be costly and also harmful to polymer storage tanks if used continually and over treated. Engine manufacturers have not made data readily available about the effects of biocides on exhaust after-treatments such as diesel particulate filters, active catalytic reduction or selective catalytic reduction.

 

Further information may be obtained by e-mail at info@westernturbo.com.

First line of Defense, at the SOURCE

Since May 15th, 2010, all diesel fuel sold in Manitoba will contain a minimum of 5% bio-diesel, of B-5. Documentation on the Province of Manitoba’s mandate can be obtained at http://www.gov.mb.ca/stem/energy/biofuels/biodiesel/.
Biodiesel may contain small but problematic quantities of water. Although it is not miscible with water, it is, like ethanol, hygroscopic (absorbs water from atmospheric moisture). One of the reasons biodiesel can absorb water is the persistence of mono and diglycerides left over from an incomplete reaction. These molecules can act as an emulsifier, allowing water to mix with the biodiesel. In addition, there may be water that is residual to processing or resulting from storage tank condensation. The presence of water is a problem because:
Water reduces the heat of combustion of the bulk fuel. This means more smoke, harder starting, less power.
Water causes corrosion of vital fuel system components: fuel pumps, injector pumps, fuel lines, etc.
Water & microbes cause the paper element filters in the system to fail (rot), which in turn results in premature failure of the fuel pump due to ingestion of large particles.
Water freezes to form ice crystals near 0 °C (32 °F). These crystals provide sites for nucleation and accelerate the gelling of the residual fuel.
Water accelerates the growth of microbe colonies, which can plug up a fuel system. Biodiesel users who have heated fuel tanks therefore face a year-round microbe problem.
Additionally, water can cause pitting in the pistons on a diesel engine.
Previously, the amount of water contaminating biodiesel has been difficult to measure by taking samples, since water and oil separate. However, it is now possible to measure the water content using water-in-oil sensors.
Further information may be obtained by e-mail at info@westernturbo.com.
Bio-Fuel Statement by Mike Munroe
Since May 15th, 2010, all diesel fuel sold in Manitoba will contain a minimum of 5% bio-diesel, of B-5.  Documentation on the Province of Manitoba’s mandate can be obtained here.
Biodiesel may contain small but problematic quantities of water. Although it is not miscible with water, it is, like ethanol, hygroscopic (absorbs water from atmospheric moisture). One of the reasons biodiesel can absorb water is the persistence of mono and diglycerides left over from an incomplete reaction. These molecules can act as an emulsifier, allowing water to mix with the biodiesel. In addition, there may be water that is residual to processing or resulting from storage tank condensation. The presence of water is a problem because:
Water reduces the heat of combustion of the bulk fuel. This means more smoke, harder starting, less power.
Water causes corrosion of vital fuel system components: fuel pumps, injector pumps, fuel lines, etc.
Water & microbes cause the paper element filters in the system to fail (rot), which in turn results in premature failure of the fuel pump due to ingestion of large particles.
Water freezes to form ice crystals near 0 °C (32 °F). These crystals provide sites for nucleation and accelerate the gelling of the residual fuel.
Water accelerates the growth of microbe colonies, which can plug up a fuel system. Biodiesel users who have heated fuel tanks therefore face a year-round microbe problem.
Additionally, water can cause pitting in the pistons on a diesel engine.
Previously, the amount of water contaminating biodiesel has been difficult to measure by taking samples, since water and oil separate. However, it is now possible to measure the water content using water-in-oil sensors.
Further information may be obtained by e-mail at info@westernturbo.com.