Category Archives: Turbocharger rebuild and repair winnipeg

When You Need to Know Diesel Diagnostics – Bosch is King

Did you know that Western Turbo is 1 of only 6 Bosch Certified Diesel Centers in all of Canada.

The BCD standing that Western has achieved mean all of our technicians are highly qualified and our diagnostic equipment is the most advanced and precise on the market. Western Turbo is authorized by Bosch for the aftermarket service and warranty of diesel pumps, injectors and spare parts.



That’s why Western Turbo is able to pinpoint all of your diesel issues through the best diagnostics in Canada.  We can help you to decide on a repair, rebuild or replacement.

For more information on Western Turbo’s Bosch Certified Diesel standing, please visit us here.

Western Turbo is your diesel service centre.

The Staff at Western Turbo Wish You a Merry Christmas and the Best of 2018.

As 2017 draws to a close, the staff at Western Turbo would like to extend Merry Christmas to you and yours.   We’d like to thank you for making us the best diesel service centre in Manitoba.
western-turbo-christmas
You have trusted us in the last year to give you the best service, parts and advice for your diesel and turbocharger challenges.  We don’t take your business for granted and appreciate every opportunity that we have to serve.
On behalf of the entire Winnipeg Western Turbo family, we wish you a safe and peaceful Christmas season and all the best for 2018.

Clean Oil Key to Keeping your Turbochargers in Top Condition

Do you feel that your diesel engine is not giving you top performance?  Your turbocharges may not be functioning properly due to damage from dirty oil.
Dirty oil damages the turbocharger by causing heavy scoring of critical bearing surfaces.
To avoid damage, oil and filter should be of a quality that is recommended by an OEM.  These should be changed when a new turbocharger is fitted by Western Turbo.  After that, regular oil and filter changes should keep your turbochargers in great condition.
Dirty oil damage could result from:
–  Blocked, damaged on poor quality oil filter
–  Dirt introduced during servicing
–  Engine wear or manufacturing debris
–  Malfunctioning oil filter by-pass valve
–  Degraded lubrication oil.
Regular maintenance by Winnipeg’s largest diesel service centre should keep your turbochargers spotless.  Western Turbo can set you up on a preventive maintenance program for your individual diesel or fleet requirements.  Whether you are in Winnipeg, or rural Manitoba, give us a call for you next service.

How does a Turbocharger work anyway?

Sometimes at Western Turbo, we get so wrapped up in helping our customers get back on the road that we forget that education is one of the best things that we can do to help our customers understand when they need to call the best diesel service centre in Manitoba.

Below is a short article on how a turbocharger works and why this is such a key component to the performance of your diesel engine.

The purpose of a turbocharger is to compress the air flowing into the diesel engine, this lets the engine squeeze more air into a cylinder and more air means that more fuel can be added. The engine burns air and fuel to create mechanical power, the more air and fuel it can burn the more powerful it is. In simple terms, a turbocharger comprises a turbine and a compressor connected by a common shaft supported on a bearing system. The turbocharger converts waste energy from an engine’s exhaust gases into compressed air, which it pushes into the engine. This allows the engine to burn more fuel producing more power and improve the overall efficiency of the combustion process. The turbine consists of two components; the turbine wheel and the collector, commonly referred to as the turbine housing. The exhaust gas is guided into the turbine wheel by the housing. The energy in the exhaust gas turns the turbine. Once the gas has passed through the blades of the wheel it leaves the turbine housing via the exhaust outlet area.

Compressors are the opposite of turbines. They consist of two sections; the impeller or compressor wheel and the compressor housing. The compressor wheel is connected to the turbine by a forged steel shaft. As the compressor wheel spins, air is drawn in and is compressed as the blades spin at a high velocity. The housing is designed to convert the high velocity, low pressure air stream, into a high pressure low velocity air stream, through a process called diffusion. In order to achieve this boost, the turbocharger uses the exhaust flow from the engine to spin a turbine, which in turn spins an air pump. The turbine in the turbocharger spins at speeds of up to 150,000 rotations per minute (rpm) that is about 30 times faster than most car engines can go. Since it is connected to the exhaust, the temperatures in the turbine are also very high. Air enters the compressor at a temperature compression causes the temperature of the air to rise it leaves the compressor cover at temperatures up to 200°C. The turbocharger bearing system is lubricated by oil from the engine. The oil is fed under pressure into the bearing housing, through to the journal bearings and thrust system. The oil also acts as a coolant taking away heat generated by the turbine. The journal bearings are a free floating rotational type.

To perform correctly, the journal bearings should float between a film of oil. The bearing clearances are very small, less than the width of a human hair. Dirty oil or blockages in the oil supply holes can cause serious damage to the turbocharger.

Western Turbo repairs turbochargers

Now that you know how a turbocharger works, we will look at some of the reasons in our next blog why turbochargers fail and how Western Turbo diagnoses the problem and decides whether to rebuild or replace.