Category Archives: Turbo

Turbocharger’s future in North America

North America‘s turbo ‘revolution’

The change in the market in North America – led by Ford – is particularly remarkable; in 2008, there were no turbocharged petrol engines made in North America, all previous turbo-fitted engines having been imported. The first North American built turbocharged petrol engine was fitted to the Lincoln MKS which used the first North American EcoBoost engine. This engine has since been fitted to the Ford Flex, Explorer and most significantly the F-series pick-up trucks.

“GM has been somewhat behind Ford in terms of the fitment of turbochargers, but it is slowly going down the same route,” said Ian Henry. “It has already started on this journey – the 2012 Cadillac XTS had a turbo option on the 3.6 litre V6 engine. GM is however also working on improving the fuel efficiency of its naturally aspirated engines and has claimed that it can achieve similar fuel efficiencies gains to those available with turbochargers through other means.”

“The impetus at Chrysler will come from Fiat’s MultiAir programme,” adds Henry.

The CAFE rules announced in 2012 will force GM and Chrysler to accelerate their use of fuel saving technologies such as turbochargers and a large part of the increased volumes which will be seen in the next few years and into the 2020s come from the widening take-up across these VMs, Ford having led the way.

According to just-auto’s QUBE data, North America currently has a turbo fitment rate below 20% but by the late 2020s, if not before, its fitment rate will be much closer to that of Europe, at close to 75%.

Best Regards,

Kenny Taylor
General Manager
Melett North America, Inc

BorgWarner EFR Turbocharger Technical Training Guide

Brock Fraser is the Chief Engineer & Team Leader of the EFR project for BorgWarner Turbo Systems. In his forward to the EFR Turbocharger Technical Training Guide, Mr. Fraser describes the project vision and the process of development. Below is an excerpt from the guide Forward by Brock Fraser

“The first thing worth explaining is the strong connection between this exciting line of aftermarket turbos and our OEM commercial vehicle products. Commercial/industrial turbo products have extreme requirements for durability, reliability, and aerodynamics performance. Turbo sizing for the performance user more resembles what’s in the commercial realm as compared to what comes from our OE passenger car developments. Also required is resistance to abusive thrust loads, vibration, and robustness for a wide range of lubrication and cooling conditions. Our OE product validation standards are very tough, and many of these same practices were employed during the development of the EFR products.

Honeywell’s 2-Cylinder Diesel Engine

A new chapter in the story of ultra-fuel efficient auto design opened in 2011 with the development of the world’s first 2-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine.

Today, the 0.8L engine, boosted by Honeywell’s smallest-ever turbo, can be seen powering vehicles through the busy streets of India’s cities and towns, typically carrying goods from warehouses to local businesses. For Honeywell, boosting such a small engine created a whole new set of design and engineering challenges.

“The issues in developing a turbo for a 2-cylinder engine not only revolve around packaging but also around specific challenges linked to compressor surge, oil leakage, high vibrations and high thrust load due to engine pulsations. These issues are far more pronounced here than in a four-cylinder engine,” says Vijayan Asvathanarayanan, Director of Application Engineering for Honeywell Turbo Technologies in India.

This meant that Honeywell engineers had to approach the turbo design from a completely new angle.

“We came up with a totally new turbocharger that included a very small turbine housing with integrated manifold, and the smallest-ever compressor wheel developed by Honeywell. The higher relative thrust loads brought about by the pulsation of a bi-cylinder engine meant creating new concept thrust pads in the Z-bearing – vital if we were to be efficient in matching the turbo to the engine requirements.”

A high-efficiency, compact bearing was developed – and the design was so successful that it is now being extended to other turbo sizes as well.

The result of this intense engineering activity is a well-performing and reliable turbo fitted in the 2-cylinder OEM production engine since 2011, which is contributing to a remarkable 25% improvement in power over a non-turbo equivalent and to significant fuel efficiency gains and lower emissions.

Critically, the proven success paves the way for the roll-out of a new generation of turbocharged 2- and 3-cylinder diesel passenger cars and light commercial vehicles, particularly in emerging regions.

Happy 100th Birthday to the Turbocharger

A century ago, Swiss engineer Alfred Buchi was studying steam turbines when inspiration struck: Why not spin the wheel with exhaust from an internal combustion engine and use the recovered energy to force-feed the intake side? It was a brilliant concept, since roughly a third of the energy in fuel is normally squandered out the tailpipe. Buchi applied for a patent to cover his invention in 1905.

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BorgWarner’s award-winning regulated two-stage (R2S®) turbo-charging technology boosts performance while helping improve fuel efficiency and lower emissions for the first four-cylinder engine in the history of the Mercedes S-Class. The 2.2-liter diesel S 250 CDI Blue EFFICIENCY is the first car in the luxury segment to consume less than 6 liters of fuel per 100 km.

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Volkswagen is fuming over the Obama Administration’s proposal to double auto fuel efficiency, saying the plan unfairly values hybrid and all-electric cars over clean diesel, a technology VW has pioneered.

Volkswagen is committed to continually making fuel efficient vehicles, such as the new mid-size, clean diesel Passat TDI, available to the U.S. market. Built in Chattanooga, TN, the Passat TDI achieves 43 mpg highway and can travel almost 800 miles on a single tank of fuel.

The Obama Administration unveiled a proposed rule that would require automakers to double the average fuel economy of their vehicles to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, estimating that the change would add $2,000 to the average price of a car.

The proposal brought howls of protest from automakers who warned the changes would price millions of Americans out of the new-car market, keeping older, less fuel-efficient cars on the road longer.

VW, Europe’s largest automaker and the fastest-growing automaker in the United States, already offers turbodiesel cars, station wagons and SUVs that routinely get nearly 50 miles per gallon on the highway.

IndyCar: BorgWarner to supply turbochargers starting in 2012

By TONY BRISCOE, AUTOMOTIVE NEWS on 5/27/2011

http://www.autoweek.com/article/20110527/IRL/110529845

BorgWarner will be the exclusive provider of turbochargers for the Izod IndyCar Series starting in 2012. The deal runs through the 2016 season, and the announcement was made on Friday, days before the 100th anniversary of the first running of the race.

BorgWarner’s Engineered for Racing (EFR) turbochargers introduce Gamma titanium-aluminide wheels, stainless-steel turbine housing and ceramic ball bearings. However, given that the EFR turbochargers were originally designed for performance enthusiasts, BorgWarner used weight-reduction techniques and end-housings to ensure racing-quality performance.

IndyCar hasn’t allowed turbochargers since its separation from CART in 1996. The league decided to allow turbochargers to generate greater competition and enhance fuel economy.

The 2012 IndyCar engine manufacturers (Chevrolet, Honda and Lotus) can use or single- or twin-turbo arrangements.

BorgWarner has deep ties to IndyCar, and the trophy named for it has been the annual prize for the Indianapolis 500 race since 1936. The nearly five-foot-four-inch-tall sterling-silver trophy has the name, average speed, date of victory and portrait of every winner since 1911.

Read more: http://www.autoweek.com/article/20110527/IRL/110529845