Stanadyne Fuel Additive Perfect Start to Get Your Diesel Ready for Winter

The snow is coming and it’s time to start getting your diesel in tip top form for the Winnipeg winter.  A fuel additive like the one offered by trusted Stanadyne can really have an impact on your diesel’s cold weather performance.  Not only does the additive improve fuel economy, it also increases horse power and torque.

 Specifically for cold weather, the additive improves the diesel pour point up to 22 degrees celsius while raising the temperature of the cold filter plug point up to 13 degrees celsius depending on base fuel.
 The additive also contains corrosion and rust inhibitors that will protect your fuel system.
Talk to us at Western Turbo, the diesel service centre. We have the know how to get you ready for our Manitoba winter.  Leverage our 30 years in business, diagnostic centre, extensive parts department and 9 bays of service to keep your diesel working at peak performance.
Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
October 30, 2017

Clean Oil Key to Keeping your Turbochargers in Top Condition

Do you feel that your diesel engine is not giving you top performance?  Your turbocharges may not be functioning properly due to damage from dirty oil.
Dirty oil damages the turbocharger by causing heavy scoring of critical bearing surfaces.
To avoid damage, oil and filter should be of a quality that is recommended by an OEM.  These should be changed when a new turbocharger is fitted by Western Turbo.  After that, regular oil and filter changes should keep your turbochargers in great condition.
Dirty oil damage could result from:
–  Blocked, damaged on poor quality oil filter
–  Dirt introduced during servicing
–  Engine wear or manufacturing debris
–  Malfunctioning oil filter by-pass valve
–  Degraded lubrication oil.
Regular maintenance by Winnipeg’s largest diesel service centre should keep your turbochargers spotless.  Western Turbo can set you up on a preventive maintenance program for your individual diesel or fleet requirements.  Whether you are in Winnipeg, or rural Manitoba, give us a call for you next service.
Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
September 26, 2017

Are you Budget Minded About Your Diesel Service? Western Turbo is Right for You!

There’s a reason why Western Turbo has become the choice of service and maintenance for diesel fleets in Winnipeg and Manitoba.
We Save You Money

Our experience and investment in equipment and people let us stand head and shoulders above others.  Here are three examples of how we can save you money and earn your business.

Save money at Western Turbo

1. Our Advice We have seen most situations when it comes to diesel challenges and we have the know how to offer suggestions on how you can save money through preventive maintenance.  As an example, by using Stanadyne Performance Fuel Additive, you can virtually eliminate wear on fuel injectors that is  caused by low lubricity fuels.
2. Our Testing Equipment Western Turbo has invested over $1,000,000 to be the premier test provider of diesel equipment in Western Canada.   We can test your parts and offer to rebuild them if it makes sense.  Again saving you money on expensive new part replacements.
3.  Sourcing Product from Multiple Vendors. We work for you, not the vendors.  We are proud of our independence and our ability to source the right part for your specific needs.  We source parts from Cat, International, GMC, Ford, Bosch, Ambac, Stanadyne, Holset, Borg Warner, Delphi, and others – ensuring that anything you need for injectors, pumps, fuel systems, filters and turbochargers are covered. We can always offer a solution that meets your budget.
At Western Turbo, we are proud of being the best diesel service centre in the marketplace.  Let us show you how the Western Turbo advantage can give you the best value in the marketplace.
Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
September 13, 2017

Getting the RV Ready for the Trip South – Chassis Maintenance

Many RV owners have interrupted their planned vacations because they didn’t take time to properly maintain their chassis. Whether your motor home is a gas or diesel, proper care for the chassis and its elements will ensure that your travels are enjoyable.

Motorhomes require scheduled preventive maintenance, just like your passenger car, SUV, or pickup truck. The difference is that they are much larger and more complex so they require a few extra (and bigger) steps to accomplish this.

The majority of the time, if there is a problem inside the RV, it won’t ruin the trip. It may become an inconvenience for example, a shower not working may mean having to camp where there is a shower. An RV owner can choose when to make those kinds of repairs, perhaps even waiting until they get back home.

A chassis issue on the other hand can end your trip dead in its tracks. Practicing preventive maintenance care for the RV chassis is the best step an owner can make. We recommend that every RV owner take the following preventative steps to help keep their RV’s  performing well:

Basic Engine Maintenance

Engine Oil and Filter

Fuel System Maintenance and Filters

Diesel & Gas Engine Cooling Systems

Engine Air Filters & Air Filter Restriction Gauge

Coolant Surge Tank

Transmissions Fluid & Filters

All Belts & Hoses

Chassis Maintenance

Brakes

Air Compressors, Tanks and Dryers

Air Dryer

Air Ride Suspension

Axles, Driveshaft and Universal Joints

Tire – Tread wear & Rotation, install Crossfire Tire pressure regulators for dual tires

Hydraulic System

Check your hydraulic Leveling system

Hydraulic Fluid Reservoir

Hydraulic filter restriction gauge

Generator

Oil & Oil Filters

Belts & Hoses

Fuel Filters

Coolant & Coolant Surge Tanks

Air Filters

We recommend you always travel with extra fuel filters, belts and hoses and take along a jug of DEF fluid, if your unit is equipped with SCR.

If you haven’t started up your RV in over a year consider putting an antifungal detergent into the diesel tank.

Preventative maintenance from the experts at Western Turbo – the diesel service centre can save your trip and can save you thousands in costly repair bills and inconvenience.  Whatever your Winnipeg or Manitoba location, book your maintenance appointment today at the best RV service centre.

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
August 22, 2017

Signs of Diesel Trouble…

If your diesel engine begins to belch excess smoke…

This could be caused by:

• Dirty air cleaner.

• Air intake system restriction.

• Cracked mounting flange/gasket missing.

• Fuel pump/injectors/valve timing incorrectly set.

• Wastegate mechanism set incorrectly.

• Turbocharger damaged.

If your diesel engine lacks Power…

This could be caused by:

• Dirty air cleaner.

• Air intake system restriction.

• Cracked mounting flange/gasket missing.

• Exhaust for foreign object restriction.

• Fuel pump/injectors/valve timing incorrectly set.

• Burnt valves and/or pistons.

• Turbocharger damaged

If your diesel engine is noisy…

Often the noise comes from air/gas leakage due to pre-turbine exhaust gas or an air/boost leaks.

Check all joints – if noise continues check turbocharger clearances and wheels for housing contact.

If your Turbocharger is seized or sluggish…

Noisy/Whistling

If the turbocharger rotor assembly has seized or is tight to rotate, this is often due to lubricating oil degradation, which can cause a high build up of carbon in the bearing housing interior restricting rotation. Insufficient or an intermittent drop in oil pressure can cause the rotor to seize, as can introducing dirt into the lubricating oil.

If your Turbocharger has worn or excessive clearance…

A turbocharger has specific axial and radial rotor clearances. These are sometimes mis-diagnosed as ‘worn bearings’ (See engine manual or come to Western Turbo.  If the clearances are out of specification the cause could be attributed to a lubricating oil problem, i.e. insufficient oil, dirt ingress, oil contamination with coolant.

If any of these signs appear, contact the diesel service experts at Western Turbo.  We will diagnose the problem and then either rebuild or replace your turbocharger.  For all your diesel engine repairs, see us at the Diesel Service Centre on 325 Eagle Road. Winnipeg.

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
July 29, 2017

How does a Turbocharger work anyway?

Sometimes at Western Turbo, we get so wrapped up in helping our customers get back on the road that we forget that education is one of the best things that we can do to help our customers understand when they need to call the best diesel service centre in Manitoba.

Below is a short article on how a turbocharger works and why this is such a key component to the performance of your diesel engine.

The purpose of a turbocharger is to compress the air flowing into the diesel engine, this lets the engine squeeze more air into a cylinder and more air means that more fuel can be added. The engine burns air and fuel to create mechanical power, the more air and fuel it can burn the more powerful it is. In simple terms, a turbocharger comprises a turbine and a compressor connected by a common shaft supported on a bearing system. The turbocharger converts waste energy from an engine’s exhaust gases into compressed air, which it pushes into the engine. This allows the engine to burn more fuel producing more power and improve the overall efficiency of the combustion process. The turbine consists of two components; the turbine wheel and the collector, commonly referred to as the turbine housing. The exhaust gas is guided into the turbine wheel by the housing. The energy in the exhaust gas turns the turbine. Once the gas has passed through the blades of the wheel it leaves the turbine housing via the exhaust outlet area.

Compressors are the opposite of turbines. They consist of two sections; the impeller or compressor wheel and the compressor housing. The compressor wheel is connected to the turbine by a forged steel shaft. As the compressor wheel spins, air is drawn in and is compressed as the blades spin at a high velocity. The housing is designed to convert the high velocity, low pressure air stream, into a high pressure low velocity air stream, through a process called diffusion. In order to achieve this boost, the turbocharger uses the exhaust flow from the engine to spin a turbine, which in turn spins an air pump. The turbine in the turbocharger spins at speeds of up to 150,000 rotations per minute (rpm) that is about 30 times faster than most car engines can go. Since it is connected to the exhaust, the temperatures in the turbine are also very high. Air enters the compressor at a temperature compression causes the temperature of the air to rise it leaves the compressor cover at temperatures up to 200°C. The turbocharger bearing system is lubricated by oil from the engine. The oil is fed under pressure into the bearing housing, through to the journal bearings and thrust system. The oil also acts as a coolant taking away heat generated by the turbine. The journal bearings are a free floating rotational type.

To perform correctly, the journal bearings should float between a film of oil. The bearing clearances are very small, less than the width of a human hair. Dirty oil or blockages in the oil supply holes can cause serious damage to the turbocharger.

Western Turbo repairs turbochargers

Now that you know how a turbocharger works, we will look at some of the reasons in our next blog why turbochargers fail and how Western Turbo diagnoses the problem and decides whether to rebuild or replace.

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
July 19, 2017

Where is Your Turbocharger from?

Dealers and garages are being warned not to fit cheap turbochargers to cars after a series of engine failures following the installation of counterfeit turbochargers.

You get what you pay for

Counterfeit turbochargers replicate the OEM tags and part numbers and try to pass them off as genuine. They are built out of very poor quality material, and are prone to short life failures. One of the issues with these turbos is containment failure.

Turbocharger Western Turbo

In the case of a wheel-burst failure, the disintegrating compressor debris can exit through the compressor cover

This event is like a hand grenade going off.

A turbocharger is a complex piece of engineering.  If standards are not high for remanufacturing, then the customer could be in for a host of problems relating to the poor performance, or the turbocharger literally exploding.

Dealing with a reputable diesel parts and service facility like Western Turbo ensures that your new or remanufactured turbocharger is of the highest standards and guaranteed to perform.  We only provide you with quality diesel turbochargers from quality manufacturers like Holset, Garrett, and Borg Warner/Schwitzer.   Before replacing, we can diagnose your existing turbocharger and offer you a quality rebuild if that makes the most sense.

Just another reason why Western Turbo is Manitoba’s diesel service centre

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
June 30, 2017

Can a Diesel Particulate Filter Cause Turbo Failure?

There are many articles and technical documents relating to how a faulty turbo can lead to DPF damage, however, the DPF is actually responsible for more turbo related failures than you might think. Here we explore what effect a blocked DPF can have on a turbocharger.

DPF’s (Diesel Particulate Filters) were first introduced in January 2005 with the Euro 4 emission standard, where diesel particulate levels were reduced to extremely low levels to reduce the allowable amount of particulate matter (PM) released into the atmosphere. Reducing the size of PM from the combustion process to this level was not technically possible, so this meant all diesel vehicles after September 2009 were fitted with a filter to capture soot and other harmful particles, preventing them entering the atmosphere. A DPF can remove around 85% of the particulates from the exhaust gas.

A blocked DPF will not work correctly, and in order to clear this blockage there are two types of regeneration that are commonly used to remove the build-up of soot. Newer vehicles engage active regeneration, which is the process of removing accumulated soot from the filter by adding fuel post-combustion to increase exhaust gas temperatures and burn off the soot, providing a temporary solution. Passive regeneration takes place automatically on motorway-type runs when the exhaust temperature is high. Many manufacturers have moved to using active regeneration, as many motorists do not often drive prolonged distances at motorway speeds to clear the DPF and constant short distances are not good for the turbo or exhaust system.

So, what happens to the turbo when a DPF is blocked?
A blocked DPF prevents exhaust gas passing through the exhaust system at the required rate. As a result, back pressure and exhaust gas temperatures increase within the turbine housing.

Increased exhaust gas temperature and back pressure can affect the turbocharger in a number of ways, including problems with efficiencies, oil leaks, carbonisation of oil within the turbo and exhaust gas leaks from the turbo.

How to spot a turbocharger that has suffered from DPF problems:
• Discolouration of parts within the core assembly (CHRA) usually with evidence that the heat is transferring through the CHRA from the turbine side. This excessive temperature within the CHRA is caused by back pressure forcing the exhaust gas through the piston ring seals and into the CHRA. The high temperature exhaust gas can prevent efficient oil cooling within the CHRA and even carbonise the oil, restricting oil feeds and causing wear to the bearing systems. This type of failure can often be mistaken as a lack of lubrication or contaminated oil.
• Carbon build-up in the turbine side piston ring groove caused by the increased exhaust gas temperatures.
• Oil leaks into the compressor housing can be seen as a consequence of exhaust gas forcing its way into the CHRA from the turbine side and forcing oil through the oil seal on the compressor side.
• A blocked DPF can force exhaust gas through the smallest of gaps, including the clearances in the bearing housing VNT lever arm and turbine housing waste gate mechanisms. If this occurs, carbon build up in these mechanisms can restrict movement of the levers affecting performance of the turbo. In some cases soot build up can be seen on the back face of the seal plate where the exhaust gas has been forced through.
• Turbine wheel failure through high cycle fatigue (HCF) caused by temperature increase.

How can you prevent these failures from occurring?
As a starting point, it is essential to identify the failure mode and determine whether a DPF related issue is the root cause. If the entire rotor assembly is ok, and there are some signs of overheating towards the turbine side of the core assembly then the failure is likely to be caused by excessive exhaust gas temperatures. High amounts of carbon build-up within the VNT mechanism and lever arms indicate a blocked DPF, and the driver may experience turbo lag or over boost of the turbo.

To help prevent turbo failure caused by DPFs:
• Determine whether the DPF is blocked.
• Contact a DPF specialist for advice.
• Replace the DPF with a high quality replacement – lower cost DPF’s will often not operate as efficiently as the original. This can replicate the environment of a blocked DPF.
• If the DPF is blocked, always replace the turbocharger core assembly to prevent possible oil leaks.
• Check the actuator achieves its full range of movement, particularly if electronic, as internal components could be worn.

One final consideration, it takes time for a DPF to block, sometimes years. Once blocked though, turbo failure can occur very quickly. If you don’t check for a DPF issue when installing a replacement turbo, there is a very high chance the replacement turbo will suffer the same failure, as it will be subject to the same operating environment as the previous unit.

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
May 3, 2017

Can a Diesel Particulate Filter Cause Turbo Failure?

There are many articles and technical documents relating to how a faulty turbo can lead to DPF damage, however, the DPF is actually responsible for more turbo related failures than you might think. Here we explore what effect a blocked DPF can have on a turbocharger.

DPF’s (Diesel Particulate Filters) were first introduced in January 2005 with the Euro 4 emission standard, where diesel particulate levels were reduced to extremely low levels to reduce the allowable amount of particulate matter (PM) released into the atmosphere. Reducing the size of PM from the combustion process to this level was not technically possible, so this meant all diesel vehicles after September 2009 were fitted with a filter to capture soot and other harmful particles, preventing them entering the atmosphere. A DPF can remove around 85% of the particulates from the exhaust gas.

A blocked DPF will not work correctly, and in order to clear this blockage there are two types of regeneration that are commonly used to remove the build-up of soot. Newer vehicles engage active regeneration, which is the process of removing accumulated soot from the filter by adding fuel post-combustion to increase exhaust gas temperatures and burn off the soot, providing a temporary solution. Passive regeneration takes place automatically on motorway-type runs when the exhaust temperature is high. Many manufacturers have moved to using active regeneration, as many motorists do not often drive prolonged distances at motorway speeds to clear the DPF and constant short distances are not good for the turbo or exhaust system.

So, what happens to the turbo when a DPF is blocked?
A blocked DPF prevents exhaust gas passing through the exhaust system at the required rate. As a result, back pressure and exhaust gas temperatures increase within the turbine housing.

Increased exhaust gas temperature and back pressure can affect the turbocharger in a number of ways, including problems with efficiencies, oil leaks, carbonisation of oil within the turbo and exhaust gas leaks from the turbo.

How to spot a turbocharger that has suffered from DPF problems:

  • Discolouration of parts within the core assembly (CHRA) usually with evidence that the heat is transferring through the CHRA from the turbine side. This excessive temperature within the CHRA is caused by back pressure forcing the exhaust gas through the piston ring seals and into the CHRA. The high temperature exhaust gas can prevent efficient oil cooling within the CHRA and even carbonise the oil, restricting oil feeds and causing wear to the bearing systems. This type of failure can often be mistaken as a lack of lubrication or contaminated oil.
  • Carbon build-up in the turbine side piston ring groove caused by the increased exhaust gas temperatures.
  • Oil leaks into the compressor housing can be seen as a consequence of exhaust gas forcing its way into the CHRA from the turbine side and forcing oil through the oil seal on the compressor side.
  • A blocked DPF can force exhaust gas through the smallest of gaps, including the clearances in the bearing housing VNT lever arm and turbine housing waste gate mechanisms. If this occurs, carbon build up in these mechanisms can restrict movement of the levers affecting performance of the turbo. In some cases soot build up can be seen on the back face of the seal plate where the exhaust gas has been forced through.
  • Turbine wheel failure through high cycle fatigue (HCF) caused by temperature increase.

How can you prevent these failures from occurring?

As a starting point, it is essential to identify the failure mode and determine whether a DPF related issue is the root cause. If the entire rotor assembly is ok, and there are some signs of overheating towards the turbine side of the core assembly then the failure is likely to be caused by excessive exhaust gas temperatures. High amounts of carbon build-up within the VNT mechanism and lever arms indicate a blocked DPF, and the driver may experience turbo lag or over boost of the turbo.

To help prevent turbo failure caused by DPFs:

  • Determine whether the DPF is blocked.
  • Contact a DPF specialist for advice.
  • Replace the DPF with a high quality replacement – lower cost DPF’s will often not operate as efficiently as the original. This can replicate the environment of a blocked DPF.
  • If the DPF is blocked, always replace the turbocharger core assembly to prevent possible oil leaks.
  • Check the actuator achieves its full range of movement, particularly if electronic, as internal components could be worn.

One final consideration, it takes time for a DPF to block, sometimes years. Once blocked though, turbo failure can occur very quickly. If you don’t check for a DPF issue when installing a replacement turbo, there is a very high chance the replacement turbo will suffer the same failure, as it will be subject to the same operating environment as the previous unit.

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection

4 Reasons Why GM is Turning To Diesel – Infographic

Written by Western Turbo Fuel Injection
March 24, 2017

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